Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Marcela Landres - Why We Need More Latino Acquisition Editors

I've been probing the internet for informative/insightful video interviews of authors, agents, editors. I came across this interesting interview with Marcela Landres, Acquition Editor. Marcela Landres is the author of "How Editors Think: The Real Reason They Rejected You". I'm adding it to my list of must reads after listening to this video. I would have added the video to this page but I wasn't able to. Here's the url to the video below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3p3dy6TEDg

There were several important points in this interview including the need for more Latino Acquistion Editors, and the need for talented writers to really hone their craft, and lastly:

Buy the Books! Don't share them! Authors don't get paid for readers, they get paid for writers.


Links:

http://www.marcelalandres.com


Recommendations: 

The Columbia Publishing Course 

BookJobs.com

Comadres and Compadres Latino Writers Conference 2013



I missed this year's Comadres and Compadres Latino Writers Conference! It slipped off my radar completely. I'm normally very good about such things. And even better, now that I have come to know and be embraced by a community of writers, they are usually the ones to give me a heads up about upcoming events and submissions. I'll be there next year for sure.  Were you able to attend?

The goal of the Comadres and Compadres Latino Writers Conference is to connect Latino writers to the agents and editors who are looking to publish them. The conference centers on three themes: access, guidance, community.

Access to publishing insiders who make decisions of who and what gets published and who are desperately seeking Latino writers.

Guidance on how to navigate their writing careers from idea, inception to publication.

And to foster a Community of like minded writers. Hope to build a nation wide community of authors that will hopefully support each other on their way to publication.


"Don't forget you are the carriers of our culture... without you we are forgotten." 
- Nora de Hoyos Comstock, Ph.D
 President and Co-Founder of Las Comrades Para Las Americas



COMADRES & COMPADRES LATINO WRITERS CONFERENCE

ACCESS • GUIDANCE • COMMUNITY

Saturday, October 5, 2013
Medgar Evers College
Brooklyn, New York 



Conference Website:
http://lascomadres.com/countonme/latino-writers-conference/



Saturday, April 13, 2013



This is also from an older draft post. I've since been part of a show, an extraordinary experience I still have to blog about but I'd thought I'd still post these earlier thoughts.

I love writing so just having a story out their in print or online and getting commented on I thought was enough but as I was recently told by an actor, when your story is told on stage its a completely different experience because of the interaction between the actors and the audience.

In this play I definitely felt the chemistry. Now and days and even back in the old days it was so hard to make a motion picture. To tell one of our stories would cost thousands of dollars and an experienced Hollywood budget and staff. At CASA 0101 what you need is an idea and some ganas to make your story into a play. And best of all its a community event with a very grass roots feel.

The Secret Lives of Bees



I'm diving into Sue Monk Kidd's The Secret Life of Bees. I don't like to be between books for very long.

I found it much of a coincidence that I had heard Sue Monk Kidd's name over three times in one week from three very different sources. My sister lent me some CDs of Sue Monk Kidd's First Light audio book. The second  was in Wayne Dyer's audio CDs on Spitirtual Living. And finally, when I was perusing my brother's bookshelf right next to his infamous political commentary personality I don't want to even mention here, was the The Secret Life of Bees on the bookshelf of my 32 year old brother I asked to borrow the book. A diverse collection of books to say the least.

Still though, I felt compelled to read and I'm immediately taken in.

Fleeting Moments



While in Alaska, my family and I saw an bald eagle soar right above our heads. It made us stop, turn, and gasp a deep breath. Later on that same trip, a brown mother (or father) bear walked in front of our bus as we slowly approached our glacier destination. Everyone got up and raced to the left side of the bus almost trampling over each other to take pictures. Both those times my instincts led me to reach for my camera. I didn't succeed with taking the shots. 

Thirteen, eleven, and eight years ago, a slimy new born baby was placed on my deflated belly and we both stared into each others eyes for the first time. I have to trust that my memory will preserve my memories for me. 

While waiting to board our cruise ship, I took a picture of an ordinary pigeon I saw later that same day to celebrate the ordinary moments. The breath taking moments, I know are irreplaceable and I entrust them to my memory. But among the rare fleeting moments are all the ordinary pigeon moments that I want to stop and recognize as well. 

Moments such as: having a conversation with my sons on our way to school; blessing my sons as they set out to school; kissing my husband goodbye or hello; cooking with my sons or having dinner as a family. Having an ordinary day in an ordinary life and feeling extraordinarily happy about it.

No one goes to Alaska to take a picture of pigeons. I did  because it represented all the ordinary moments in my ordinary life.